Sunday, March 15, 2020

Brave New World vs Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde essays

Brave New World vs Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde essays Everybody seeks truth, some seek absolute factual truth and some people seek truths based on what they want to believe and what makes them comfortable. The novels The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Hr. Hyde, by Robert Louis Stevenson and Brave New World, by Aldous Huxley are similar because they talk about a person protecting their reputation and outward appearance. These novels are also contrasting because the characters find different truths and deal with them in different ways. The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde is a novel about a man who takes on the role of investigator yet has problems handling the truth about his case. He discovers a truth so menacing that he is quiet with the information and sure of himself when he finally decides to share it with the authorities. Stevenson was born in Edinburgh in 1850 and had no other siblings. He suffered from poor health as a child and missed school regularly. He went to Edinburgh University at seventeen and soon discovere d his hostility towards his parents. He then adopted the role of liberal bohemian and took up the study of law, though he knew he would never practice. Brave New World is a novel about an outsiders experience with the World State and how he struggles to fit in. Huxley was born in Surrey, England in 1894 into a family that included some of the most distinguished members of that part of the English ruling class. His grandfather was a great biologist who helped develop the theory of evolution. His mother was the sister of Mrs. Humphrey Ward, the novelist; and the niece of Matthew Arnold, the poet. The strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde and Brave New World are intricate novels that illustrate the extents that people will go to avoid scandal, maintain their reputations and how people deal with the reality of life in the end. People will avoid scandal rather than discovering the truth. In The strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, the main ch...

Friday, February 28, 2020

Summarize chapter one Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 500 words

Summarize chapter one - Essay Example A network of packet switches and communication links work hand in hand with end systems since they are effectively connected together. Some of the communication links include optical fiber, radio spectrum and cooper wire and they are made up of different physical media types. This links differ since each one of them transmits data at different rates in bits/second. A route or path is referred to as a sequence at which packet switches and communication links are traversed by a packet from the sending end system to the receiving end system. A Services description defines the internet as an infrastructure which provides various services to different applications such as social networks, remote login and video streaming. An application Programming Interface helps in specifying how a program running on one end system asks the Internet infrastructure to deliver certain data to specific program running on another end system destination. By considering some human analogies, humans in all times, execute protocols in order to understand the notion of a computer network protocol. The actions taken by humans when they send or receive messages through the internet contributes to the practice of human protocol role. Different humans have got different protocols since they respond differently when they send or receive these messages. In network protocols, the entities used in exchanging messages and taking actions are software components like computers or hardware, unlike human protocols. A network protocol largely governs all activities in the internet which involve two or more entities in communicating remote. Through internet network connection, digital subscriber line (DSL), cable, Dial- up and satellite has been developed. For example a residence may obtain DSL Internet access from the same local telephone company which provides its local phone access that is wired. On the other hand, cable Internet access enhances us e of the cable television

Tuesday, February 11, 2020

Buying School Clunkers Make More Sense than a Brand New Car Essay

Buying School Clunkers Make More Sense than a Brand New Car - Essay Example Clunkers may look like they should be retired because they need somebody work or does not have the latest bells and whistles but with proper maintenance, it gets the kid from point A to point B. That is all that should matter to them at their ages. † That is sound advice coming from a man who makes his living selling cars. A new car will the owners back by at least $20,000 while a clunker can easily be had for around $2,000 and up, there truly does seem to be an economic advantage to owning a clunker. Provided the new owner of the car will not mind shelling out some extra dollars for whatever repairs the car might need. He still comes out ahead in the long run than if he had bought a new car. While most teenage kids of driving age look forward to waking up to a brand new car being delivered to their doorstep on the morning of their birthday, the economics of our times have changed that pattern. Since a brand new car loses approximately 20 percent of its value the minute it is d riven off the car lot, buying your teenage kid a â€Å"teaching car† which is what some parents and mechanics prefer to call the clunkers, turns out to be a big bargain. Buying a car that is more than ten years old often is often seen as a waste of money because of the cost of repairs that are involved in whipping the car into shape. Wise buyers though know that is not the case. In fact, the old clunkers can help you save money in the long run even with the cost of repairs thrown in.  ... He still comes out ahead in the long run than if he had bought a new car. While most teenage kids of driving age look forward to waking up to a brand new car being delivered at their doorstep on the morning of their birthday, the economics of our times have changed that pattern. Since a brand new car loses approximately 20 percent of its value the minute it is driven off the car lot, buying you teenage kid a â€Å"teaching car† which is what some parents and mechanics prefer to call the clunkers, turns out to be a big bargain. Buying a car that is more than ten years old often is often seen as a waste of money because of the cost of repairs that are involved in whipping the car into shape. Wise buyers though know that is not the case. In fact, the old clunkers can help you save money in the long run even with the cost of repairs thrown in. People like Joel Berry (Why I Drive a 13-Year-Old Car, 2009) understand that economics plays an important role in car buying decisions. In his case, he has been driving the same second hand 1995 Geo Prizm for a number of years now and far as he is concerned, the car is far from being the old clunker that his friends think his car to be. Joel explains; â€Å"I bought my Geo Prizm in 1995 with 5,000 miles on it. It now has 140,000 miles on it and still runs fine. I paid off the car in 1999. It is now 2008.I haven’t had a car payment in nine years. How much has this saved? Our payments for this car were $250 a month. Over nine years, I’ve gone 108 months without making a payment. At $250 a month, that’s a savings of $27,000. Over the lifetime of the car, I’ve spent less than $2000 in repairs. Subtracting this from my savings still leaves me with $25,000 extra over buying a new car right

Friday, January 31, 2020

How duration affects the rate of electrolysis in a Voltaic Cell Essay Example for Free

How duration affects the rate of electrolysis in a Voltaic Cell Essay Design and Conduct an experiment to investigate the effect of ONE FACTOR on redox reactions. Introduction:- The two main components of redox reactions are reduction and oxidation. Reduction is a gain in electrons and the decrease in oxidation number whereas oxidation is the loss of electrons and the increase in oxidation number. Voltaic cells, also known as galvanic cells generate their own electricity. The redox reaction in a Voltaic cell is a spontaneous reaction. For this reason, voltaic cells are commonly used as batteries. Voltaic cell reactions supply energy which is used to perform work. The energy is harnessed by situating the oxidation and reduction reactions in separate containers, joined by an apparatus (known as the salt bridge which primarily completes a circuit and maintains electrical neutrality) that allows electrons to flow. The functions of a voltaic cell are quite simple. There happens to be an anode and a cathode. The positive ions go the negative electrode (anode) whereas the negative ions go to the positive electrode (cathode). Electrons always flow from the anode (where oxidation takes place) to the cathode (where reduction takes place). Electrons flow across wires whereas ions flow across the electrolyte and the salt bridge. Aim:- The objective of this experiment is to see how the time affects the mass of the zinc electrode (anode) and the copper electrode (cathode) in a voltaic cell. Variables:- Variable Type of variable How it will be controlled Time (s) Independent (The one you change) Values from 5 to 35 minutes will be used Mass of anode cathode (g) Dependent (The one you measure) Electrodes will be measured after each time interval Current (A) Controlled Measure the current with the help on an ammeter Initial mass of cathode and anode (g) Controlled Weigh out the electrodes using top pan balance from the beginning of the experiment Charge on ion Controlled Use the same solution for all the trials. The charge on the copper ion should be 2+ since the copper 2+ is being converted to copper metal. The charge on the zinc ion should be 0 because Zn is being converted to Zn 2+ Concentration of electrolyte Controlled Use the same solution for all the trials. The solution primarily should be 1 mol dm-3 (just like standard conditions) Area of electrodes (cm2) Controlled Measure the electrodes to ensure they have the same dimensions (92.5cm). Use the same electrodes for all the trials. Volume of electrolyte (cm3) Controlled Use a measuring cylinder to measure out the electrolytes volume Atmosphere which we are working under Controlled Primarily we are working under standard room temperature of 298 K Apparatus:- * 122.5cm2 copper electrode * 122.5cm2 zinc electrode * 100cm3 1mol dm-3 Zinc sulphate solution * 100cm3 1mol dm-3 copper (II) sulphate solution * Filter paper (required to create a salt bridge) * 100cm3 of potassium nitrate solution (the spectator ion which I will require for creating the salt bridge which will complete the circuit and maintain electrical neutrality) * 2x200cm3 beakers * Stopwatch (à ¯Ã‚ ¿Ã‚ ½0.01s) * 1x100cm3 measuring cylinder (à ¯Ã‚ ¿Ã‚ ½1.0cm3) * Voltmeter * 2 connecting wires * Top pan balance (à ¯Ã‚ ¿Ã‚ ½0.01g) Method:- 1) Set up the voltaic cell. Use a measuring cylinder to measure out 100cm3 of copper sulphate solution. Pour it into the 200 cmà ¯Ã‚ ¿Ã‚ ½ beaker. 2) Next do the same for zinc sulphate. Use a measuring cylinder to help measure out 100cm3 of zinc sulphate solution. Pour it into a different 200 cmà ¯Ã‚ ¿Ã‚ ½ beaker. 3) Weigh the masses of the electrodes separately using a top pan balance. Record the initial masses. 4) Connect the wires to the outlets in the zinc and copper electrode. Place them in the corresponding outlets of the voltmeter. 5) After that we cut out some filter paper and dip that into our spectator ion (potassium nitrate) in order to build a salt bridge. The salt bridge will primarily complete the circuit, allow flow of ions and maintain electrical neutrality. The salt bridge will be placed in such a way that the ends of the salt bridge will be touching separate solutions of zinc sulphate and copper sulphate. The overall circuit should resemble the diagram in Figure.1. 6) Place the zinc electrode into the beaker with the zinc sulphate solution and the copper electrode into the beaker with the copper sulphate solution and at the same time, start the stopwatch. Keep the stopwatch running until 200 seconds elapse. *Note- we will be recording the time every 5 minutes because 1 or 2 minutes simply isnt enough for the change to take place 7) Take the cathode out of the solution and measure its mass (remember, before doing so, shake it a couple of times in order to remove any moisture). Record the mass. Do the same for the zinc electrode 8) Place the electrodes into their respective solutions once again and start timing. Repeat steps 5 to 6 9) Repeat the same steps until we get mass readings for up to 60 minutes of experimenting. Data Collection and Processing Raw data:- Initial mass of anode (zinc electrode): 31.29 à ¯Ã‚ ¿Ã‚ ½0.01g Initial mass of cathode (copper electrode): 32.05 à ¯Ã‚ ¿Ã‚ ½0.01g Table 1 Mass of anode and cathode obtained from different time intervals Duration of electrolysis (à ¯Ã‚ ¿Ã‚ ½0.21s) Mass of anode (zinc electrode) (à ¯Ã‚ ¿Ã‚ ½0.01g) Mass of cathode (copper electrode) (à ¯Ã‚ ¿Ã‚ ½0.01g) 300.00 (5 minutes) 31.27 32.08 600.00 (10 minutes) 31.14 32.16 900.00 (15 minutes) 31.08 32.27 1200.00 (20 minutes) 31.00 32.42 1500.00 (25 minutes) 30.83 32.49 1800.00 (30 minutes) 30.61 32.80 2100.00 (35 minutes) 30.25 33.08 Qualitative observations:- We can see that the copper is deposited at the cathode where the cathode begins to get more pink/ brownish colour. Blue colour of copper sulphate solution begins to get paler. Zinc electrode begins to corrode a bit. Most corrosion can be observed at 35 minutes time interval. Note* Uncertainties: The average reaction time was à ¯Ã‚ ¿Ã‚ ½0.5s even though it did alter from interval to interval. Note that there is also a à ¯Ã‚ ¿Ã‚ ½0.01s time uncertainty in the stopwatch itself. The uncertainty for mass is inscribed on the top pan balance as well. Data Processing: We must now calculate the mass changes which have taken place due to experimenting with different time intervals. (Different time intervals would result in a different mass change) This can be calculated simply by doing the following: Mass change = final mass initial mass Due note however that this formula can only be used for calculating the mass change taking place at the cathode (copper electrode where reduction takes place). This is because copper 2+ is being converted to copper metal and is being deposited at the cathode. Obviously this would result in a mass gain at the cathode. Therefore, it would be better for us to use the formula Mass change = final mass initial mass so that it gives us a positive value for the mass change taking place at the cathode. Example 1 Mass change = final mass initial mass = 32.08 32.05 = 0.03g Example 2 Now to calculate the mass change taking place at the anode (zinc electrode), we use the following formula, Mass change = initial mass- final mass. In this case we use this formula because we know that the zinc is being oxidized to zinc 2+ leading the zinc electrode to corrode. This therefore results in a decrease in mass of the anode (zinc electrode). Thus, it would be better for us to use the formula Mass change = initial mass final mass so that it gives us a positive value for the mass change taking place at the anode. Mass change = initial mass final mass = 31.29 31.27 = 0.02 Table 2 -Mass changes of anode and cathode for each time interval Time (à ¯Ã‚ ¿Ã‚ ½0.21s) Mass change of Anode (Zinc electrode)(à ¯Ã‚ ¿Ã‚ ½0.01g) Mass change of cathode (copper electrode) (à ¯Ã‚ ¿Ã‚ ½0.01g) 300.00 (5 minutes) 0.02 0.03 600.00 (10 minutes) 0.15 0.11 900.00 (15 minutes) 0.21 0.22 1200.00 (20 minutes) 0.29 0.37 1500.00 (25 minutes) 0.46 0.44 1800.00 (30 minutes) 0.68 0.75 2100.00 (35 minutes) 1.04 1.03 Graph 1:- Graph 2:- To derive the equation for the two separate reactions, the number of electrons gained or lost during the process has to be deduced. The mass change per minute can be deduced from the gradient. Therefore we first calculate the gradient of graph 1 (mass changes for zinc electrode). For calculating the gradient, find two points which perfectly fits in the grid. In this case, the points (0.04. 100) and (0.08, 200) Gradient= (Y2 Y1) à ¯Ã‚ ¿Ã‚ ½ (X2 X1) = (0.08- 0.04) à ¯Ã‚ ¿Ã‚ ½ (200 100) = (0.04) à ¯Ã‚ ¿Ã‚ ½ (100) = 0.0004 Therefore, the gradient of the first graph is 0.0002. So the mass change per minute for the anode is 0.0004. Next, we calculate the gradient of graph 2 (mass changes for copper electrode). To find the gradient, we work with the points (0.20. 500) and (0.24, 700) Gradient= (Y2 Y1) à ¯Ã‚ ¿Ã‚ ½ (X2 X1) = (700 500) à ¯Ã‚ ¿Ã‚ ½ (0.24- 0.20) = (200) à ¯Ã‚ ¿Ã‚ ½ (0.04) = 0.0002 Therefore, the gradient of the first graph is 0.0002. So the mass change per minute for the cathode is 0.0002. The uncertainties also need to be propagated through the summation of the fractional uncertainties. Uncertainties regarding zinc electrode:- Fractional uncertainty of mass = absolute uncertainty à ¯Ã‚ ¿Ã‚ ½ actual value = 0.01 à ¯Ã‚ ¿Ã‚ ½ 0.02 = 0.500 Fractional uncertainty of time = absolute uncertainty à ¯Ã‚ ¿Ã‚ ½ actual value = 0.21 à ¯Ã‚ ¿Ã‚ ½ 300 = 0.0007 = 0.001 Total uncertainty = 0.001 + 0.500 = 0.501 to 3 decimal places Therefore the rate of change is 0.004 à ¯Ã‚ ¿Ã‚ ½ 0.501 g/s Table 3 Rate of change for each time interval for anode (zinc electrode) Time (à ¯Ã‚ ¿Ã‚ ½0.21s) Rate of change of anode (zinc electrode) (g/s) 60.00 0.004à ¯Ã‚ ¿Ã‚ ½0.501 120.00 0.004à ¯Ã‚ ¿Ã‚ ½0.067 180.00 0.004à ¯Ã‚ ¿Ã‚ ½0.048 240.00 0.004à ¯Ã‚ ¿Ã‚ ½0.035 300.00 0.004à ¯Ã‚ ¿Ã‚ ½0.022 360.00 0.004à ¯Ã‚ ¿Ã‚ ½0.015 420.00 0.004à ¯Ã‚ ¿Ã‚ ½0.001 To calculate the number of electrons in zinc electrode, the following equation may be used:- Number of electrons = molar mass à ¯Ã‚ ¿Ã‚ ½ mass of electrode (mass of one of the samples) = 65.37 à ¯Ã‚ ¿Ã‚ ½ 31.27 = 2.09 Therefore, this would be the half-equation which would occur at the cathode: Zn Zn2.09+ + 2.09e- Due to the loss in a bit more electrons compared to the theoretical formula, it would be a stronger reducing agent therefore the electrode potential would be lower (more negative) than that of the original value. Nevertheless, the electrode potential cannot be determined. Uncertainties regarding copper electrode:- Fractional uncertainty of mass = absolute uncertainty à ¯Ã‚ ¿Ã‚ ½ actual value = 0.01 à ¯Ã‚ ¿Ã‚ ½ 0.03 = 0.333 Fractional uncertainty of time = absolute uncertainty à ¯Ã‚ ¿Ã‚ ½ actual value = 0.21 à ¯Ã‚ ¿Ã‚ ½ 300 = 0.0007 = 0.001 Total uncertainty = 0.001 + 0.333= 0.334 to 3 decimal places Therefore the rate of change is 0.002 à ¯Ã‚ ¿Ã‚ ½ 0.334 g/s Table 3 Rate of change for each time interval for cathode (copper electrode) Time (à ¯Ã‚ ¿Ã‚ ½0.21s) Rate of change of cathode (copper electrode) (g/s) 60.00 0.002à ¯Ã‚ ¿Ã‚ ½0.334 120.00 0.002à ¯Ã‚ ¿Ã‚ ½0.091 180.00 0.002à ¯Ã‚ ¿Ã‚ ½0.046 240.00 0.002à ¯Ã‚ ¿Ã‚ ½0.027 300.00 0.002à ¯Ã‚ ¿Ã‚ ½0.023 360.00 0.002à ¯Ã‚ ¿Ã‚ ½0.013 420.00 0.002à ¯Ã‚ ¿Ã‚ ½0.010 To calculate the number of electrons in copper electrode, the following equation may be used:- Number of electrons = molar mass à ¯Ã‚ ¿Ã‚ ½ mass of electrode (mass of one of the samples) = 65.50 à ¯Ã‚ ¿Ã‚ ½ 32.08 = 2.04 Therefore, this would be the half-equation which would occur at the cathode: Cu2.04+ + 2.04e- Cu Due to the gain of a bit more electrons compared to the theoretical formula, it would be a slightly weaker oxidizing agent therefore the electrode potential would be slightly lower than that of the original value. Nevertheless, the electrode potential cannot be determined. Conclusion My results show that as the duration/ time intervals increase, the mass of the anode (zinc electrode) decreases and the mass of the cathode (copper electrode) increases. We can see that there is a strong positive correlation between the time it takes for both electrodes to change in masses. If the duration is longer, then more electrons flow from the zinc electrode to the copper electrode (anode to cathode) through the electrical wires, while ions flow through the salt bridge to complete. As we know, in a voltaic cell/ galvanic cell, oxidation occurs at the anode (negative electrode) where as reduction occurs at the cathode (positive electrode). Primarily, zinc is oxidized at the anode and converted to zinc 2+. This causes corrosion at the zinc electrode due to the metal being converted to ions thus the mass of the zinc electrode (anode) decreases. On the other hand, copper undergoes reduction at the cathode and the copper 2+ ions get converted to copper metal. This causes the copper metal to be deposited at the cathode thus leading to the copper electrode (cathode) to increase in mass as the duration is increased. The following anodic reaction takes place at the zinc electrode (this is the theoretical equation):- Zn (s) Zn2+ (aq) + 2e- However the equation we found experimentally is:- Zn Zn2.09+ + 2.09e- Hence, this suggests that since the former zinc sample has more electrons to lose, it is an even stronger oxidizing agent compared to the theoretical equation and is slightly higher in the electrochemical series than the latter zinc samples. According to the results that have been gathered, there is a positive correlation between the time it takes to electrolyse an aqueous solution and the rate of electrolysis. The rate of electrolysis was measured using the mass of cathode. If the duration of electrolysis is longer, then more electrons will flow through the circuit and more ions will flow from the anode to the cathode. Oxidation occurs at the anode whereas reduction occurs at the cathode. The cathode gains electrons therefore the mass decreases. The following reaction has taken place (although this is the theoretical equation): Cu2+ (aq) + 2e- Cu (s) However, the experimental equation is: Cu1.75+ + 1.75e- Cu Therefore this implies that since the former copper sample has more electrons to gain, it is a stronger oxidizing agent and it is lower in the electrochemical series than the latter copper sample. The value of the electrode potential hasnt been calculated, however, the number of electrons is 25% off there that shows that there is a great difference between the literature value and the experimental value. According to the graph in the previous page, there is a very strong positive correlation between the mass change and duration of electrolysis as can be deduced from the high R squared value. The change in mass over a certain period of time is very gradual because of the size of the electrons. Although a lot of electrons are able to flow through the electrolyte, there is not such a drastic change. By looking at the graph, almost all the error bars for the points touch the line of best fit which means the data is fairly accurate. The theoretical mass of a copper electrode would be 31.75g. From the results that have been tabulated, the mass of a copper electrode is 36.21g. The percentage error can be calculated using the following formula: Percentage error = difference x 100 theoretical value = 4.46 x 100 31.75 = 14.04% This shows that although there is not such a big difference between the theoretical value and the experimental value. Evaluation Limitation Type of error Improvement The mass of the anode was not measured therefore the rate of electron transfer between the two electrodes could not be determined. This could have increased or decreased the mass of the cathode. Random Measure the mass of the anode The power pack has internal resistance therefore not all the current was emitted. This could have decreased the current, thus decreasing the number of electrons produced. Random Use a resistor to accurately measure the current The top pan balance had a zero offset error. This could have increased the mass of the cathode. Systematic Use the top pan balance with the 0.001 uncertainty to obtain more accurate values. a

Thursday, January 23, 2020

The Pros and Cons of Postponing Childbearing :: Pro Con Essays

The trend to postpone childbearing has resulted in many children having older parents. What do you see as advantages and disadvantages for these children? What benefits and problems might result for parents being older? Advantages for children: -their parents are more relaxed -their parents have more money -their parents are wiser and can teach them more about life Advantages for parents: -they have the means to support the kids -they don't have to miss out on the fun of being young -they are ready to settle down -they are more patient and relaxed with the children -they will have someone to take care of them when they are old Disadvantages for children: -their parents are old and less energetic -their parents do not related as well with them as if they were younger -they may be embarrassed of their parents being old, especially during adolescence -their parents may die and get sick before the children are mature enough to deal with it -they probably wont get to know their grandparents Disadvantages for parents: -Retirement might not be as relaxing -their health may fail before they are done raising their children -their children may be embarrassed of them Write a brief letter to a new parent in which you describe information about games to play with the baby which will reveal the perceptual abilities of the baby. Base your games on current research and tasks from the Brazelton Scale. Dear New Parent,   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Based on current research and tasks from the Brazelton Scale, I would like to recommend games to play with your new baby. These games will reveal the perceptual abilities of the baby. Read books to the baby with simple black and white pictures. Repeat the book checking the baby's responses to your voice and the pictures in the book. Have a rattle for the new baby. Play with the rattle and check the baby's response to the rattle. Reading a story to the baby will also check its response to inanimate visual and auditory stimuli. Play peek-a-boo with the baby. This will test the defensive movements of the baby (place your hands over the baby's eyes as well). As the baby grows older, you can read more visually stimulating books. Eventually, you need to let your baby make its own gaming decisions. Plan a one-week school lunch program for young children based upon information presented in Chapter 6. Monday Grilled Chicken, (skinless and boneless) Baked potato (free of butter and sour cream) Green beans or broccoli Skim milk or chocolate skim milk

Wednesday, January 15, 2020

Importance of Parental Involvement on the Academic Performance of Grade V-VI Pupils

Parent involvement is absolutely essential to student achievement in school and in life. The overwhelming studies and research indicate that there are positive academic outcomes stemming from parental involvement with benefits beginning in early childhood throughout adolescence and beyond (Henderson & Mapp, 2002; Patrikakou, Weisberg, Redding, & Walberg, 2005).The impact that parents can have on their child's learning and achievement transcends income levels and social status. â€Å"In fact, the most accurate predictor of a student's achievement in school is not income or social status, but the extent to which that student's family is able to: 1. Create a home environment that encourages learning; 2. Express high (but not unrealistic) expectations for their children's achievement and future careers; 3. Become involved in their children's education at school and in the community.† If two of these three criteria are accomplished, children of low income families will achieve at o r above the levels expected of middle class children.Parental involvement does not only mean that it leads to higher academic achievement, but to better attendance and improved behavior at home and school as well. When school and home, work together collaboratively, and using a competent approach to education, it can make a huge difference in student achievement. Students value their education when they see the interest shown by their parents. When children achieve, everyone benefit.As children excel, the school is recognized, the teachers are recognized and the parents and other family members of those children are encouraged to extend their knowledge by going back to school. The purpose of this study is to reveal how important is parental involvement on the academic the performance of Grade V-VI pupils at school. This aims to show the readers that parents can be a great supporter and a big help for their children to become inspired to study harder.

Tuesday, January 7, 2020

The Cognitive Stages Of Children Essay - 843 Words

Jean Piaget in my opinion, opened up a whole new world when he discovered the cognitive stages. I never really understood what former co-workers were talking about at a previous preschool I had worked at until after reading about Jean Piaget. Right then, I had that ah hah moment and put two and two together. He opened my eyes and made me realize how my children and others develop. All children develop at their own speed, but the certain stages that he developed you can totally notice at those certain stages of their life. In the Sensorimotor Stage, from birth to two years old babies see the world through looking, listening, touching, mouthing and grasping. They develop how to move their hands and limbs in order to make things work. Schemas start to develop such as reflex and repeating and action that just happened. Developmental habits start to form such as coordination between vision and mental apprehension. Understanding, walking, discovering new objects and the internalizat ion of schemas. The sensorimotor stage in my opinion is a very important stage for child develop. There are so many things between birth and two years old that they need to develop. I feel that is very important for parents to closely monitor if their child isn’t doing something that they should be doing at this stage. All children develop at their own speed, but there are certain milestones that they need to achieve during this time span. Some parents may not know what to look for, so itShow MoreRelatedCognitive Developmental Stages Of Children1916 Words   |  8 Pageswell-known cognitive developmental psychologist, Jean Piaget, proposed 4 different cognitive stages of human development. Based on his examination and research on children, Piaget determined that these four cognitive developmental stages were associated with the achievement of particular milestones. The first stage of Piaget’s cognitive developmental stage is the Sensory Motor Stage. It occurs from birth to 2 years. The second one is the pre-operational Stage, which occurs in children aged aroundRead MorePiaget s Stage Theory Account For Children s Cognitive Development1759 Words   |  8 Pageswell does Piaget’s stage theory account for children’s cognitive development? Intro Piaget believed there were four stages in a child’s cognitive development and sub stages within these stages. These stages have been the object of debate since Piaget introduced them and are still continuously debated. All of the stages are very concrete and large scale. They don’t account for children at a particular age who are behind or ahead. Piaget underestimated the capability of children to do particular thingsRead MoreHow Does Piaget s Stage Theory Account For Children s Cognitive Development?1576 Words   |  7 PagesHow does Piaget’s stage theory account for children’s cognitive development? Jean Piaget (1896-1980) had a stage theory about cognitive development and how it works with children. There are 4 stages to this theory; sensorimotor, preoperational, concrete operational and formal operational. Piaget emphasised that they occur in this order. (Smith, Cowie, Blades, 2015, p. 446). He considered the fact that the way child’s mind develops, intellectually, is a continuous process of Assimilation and AccommodationRead MorePiagets Theory of Cognitive Development Essays1715 Words   |  7 Pagespsychologist who had a lifelong interest in how individuals, especially children, use cognitive development to adapt to the world around them. Piaget published his first paper by the age of 10, completed his bachelor’s degree by the age of 18, and at the age of 22 received his PhD from the University of Neuchatel. Piaget spent many years of his life researching the developmental and cognitive knowledge of children. The Theory of Cognitive Development places focu s on human intelligence and developmentalRead MorePiaget And Vygotsky Theory Of Cognitive Development Essay826 Words   |  4 Pagesconcept of cognitive development and, highlight both Piaget and Vygotsky’s theory as it relates to cognitive development, and the significant differences between them. The term cognitive development refers to the process of growth and change in intellectual, mental abilities such as thinking, reasoning and understanding. It comprises of the acquisition and consolidation of knowledge. Infants draw on social-emotional, language, motor, and perceptual experience and abilities for cognitive developmentRead MoreTheories Of Development : Piagets Theory Of Cognitive Development1363 Words   |  6 PagesPiagets theory of cognitive development In the 1960s and 1970s, the Freudian psychology was changed with the initiation of the empirical methods to study the human behavior. Psychologist and philosopher Jean Piaget empirically verified, moving towards the cognitive development theory to provide the new perspective to the individual in getting awareness about the developmental stages of the children. Just like Freud, Piaget thought that human development could only be described in stages. On the otherRead MoreJean Piaget s Cognitive Theory Essay1750 Words   |  7 Pageswell-renowned twentieth century scholar responsible for the development of the Cognitive Theory, focusing on how people think over time, which, in turn, reflects in how how attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors are shaped. Jean Piaget observed and divided the Cognitive Theory into four periods of cognitive development, which occur in the following order: sensorimotor, preoperational, concrete operational, and formal operational. Of the four stages, each has ità ¢â‚¬â„¢s own characteristics and developmental gains, whichRead MoreCognitvie Development1150 Words   |  5 PagesCognitive Development in Children Elteen Herman Sinte Gleska University PY 100 General Psychology Haelee Engel December 12, 2012 Introduction†¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦ Cognitive Development What is Cognitive Development? †¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦ Piaget’s Theory on Learning †¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦. How Cognitive learning can differ through cultures†¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦. Cognitive Teaching Identifying children who may have a learning disability†¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦ What parents and teacherRead MoreEssay on Piagets Learning Theory in Elementary Education1549 Words   |  7 Pagesdevelopmental psychology: (1) Cognitive development as it relates to Piaget and (2) social development as it relates to Vygotsky. An educator may find it useful to study Piaget’s theory of cognitive development to help children build on their own knowledge. Piaget’s Theory of Cognitive Development. Jean Piaget (1896-1980) was a Swiss psychologist who is known for his studies of intellectual development in children (Strickland, 2001). His theory of cognitive development views children as â€Å"little scientistsRead MoreSocio Cultural Theory And Piaget s Cognitive Development Theory1493 Words   |  6 PagesThe two theorists that I have chosen to compare are Vygotsky for his work on the socio-cultural theory and Piaget’s Cognitive Development theory. The socio-cultural theory focuses on how norms, culture, beliefs and values are passed onto the next generation in a society (Berk, 2007). Piaget was the first psychologist to study cognitive development and described his work as genetic epistemology. He was concerned with how essential concepts such as the idea of time, numbers, justice etc. arose (Siegler